Month: May 2015

Administrative Staffing 1987-2011, A Statistical Profile by Institution, Part 3: American Samoa and Arizona

ACADEME BLOG

The federal data that is being presented in this series of posts was analyzed by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NCIR) in collaboration with the American Institutes for Research. The NECIR story on the data and its implications, written by Jon Marcus, who is currently an editor at the Hechinger Report, is available at: http://necir.org/2014/02/06/new-analysis-shows-problematic-boom-in-higher-ed-administrators/.

NECIR is one of a number of foundation-supported nonprofits that produce journalism in collaboration with other media, in this case the Boston NPR station and the Huffington Post, where this story also ran.

The data is being re-posted here with the permission of Jon Marcus.

I believe that it is worth presenting the data state by state because, in its totality, the material is so extensive as to be overwhelming. I also hope that presenting it state by state may encourage some further use of it by our chapters and conferences…

View original post 58 more words

Even for Jindal’s Louisiana, This Seems Ludicrous

ACADEME BLOG

I have done a number of posts on Bobby Jindal’s political calculations and their impact on public higher education in Louisiana, and I am planning several more posts on the ongoing budget issues in the state.

But I have just come across a news item that has left me scratching my head.

But, first, here a thumbnail overview of what I have covered in previously posts about the state’s budget woes. Over his two terms as governor, Jindal has been cutting taxes in Louisiana and reducing appropriations to public colleges and universities, as well as other public institutions, in good times and bad. The state’s is very dependent on the oil and gas industries for much of its revenue, and when energy prices were high, Jindal decided that the state could give still further tax breaks to the industry. Well, now that energy prices are down, the state is facing…

View original post 529 more words

Ohio Student Association Testimony before the Ohio Senate on Student Debt: Part 2

ACADEME BLOG

Testimony before the Senate Finance Subcommittee on Higher Education

Presented by Grace Goodluck

May 19th, 2015

Honorable Chairman Gardner and members of the committee,

My name is Grace Goodluck, and I just completed my sophomore year at Kent State University. College was always presented to me as an inevitable part of my future–I was told from childhood that I would attend college, in order to get a job and have a successful future. The part that I did not realize until it was time to actually take this step is how hard this process actually is–getting into the university you wanted did not necessarily mean it was the one you could afford to go to.

I am a graduate from Cleveland Heights High School, and my first semester of college, I attended Cleveland State University and commuted from my parents house. I had made this decision because it…

View original post 772 more words

Administrative Staffing 1987-2011, A Statistical Profile by Institution, Part 2: Alabama (Part 2) and Alaska

ACADEME BLOG

The federal data that is being presented in this series of posts was analyzed by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NCIR) in collaboration with the American Institutes for Research. The NECIR story on the data and its implications, written by Jon Marcus, who is currently an editor at the Hechinger Report, is available at: http://necir.org/2014/02/06/new-analysis-shows-problematic-boom-in-higher-ed-administrators/.

NECIR is one of a number of foundation-supported nonprofits that produce journalism in collaboration with other media, in this case the Boston NPR station and the Huffington Post, where this story also ran.

The data is being re-posted here with the permission of Jon Marcus.

I believe that it is worth presenting the data state by state because, in its totality, the material is so extensive as to be overwhelming. I also hope that presenting it state by state may encourage some further use of it by our chapters and conferences, as…

View original post 41 more words

Ohio Student Association Testimony before the Ohio Senate on Student Debt: Part 1

ACADEME BLOG

Testimony before the Senate Finance Subcommittee on Higher Education

Presented by Rachael Collyer

May 19th, 2015

Honorable Chairman Gardner and members of the committee,

My name is Rachael Collyer and I address you today both as a student with a personal stake in the issue and also as an educational justice organizer with the Ohio Student Association. The Ohio Student Association builds grassroots political power to elevate the voices of Ohio’s youth. We are currently active at six universities and in two cities;  we organize and advocate on issues that affect young people; and we engage thousands of young people in the political process. In 2014, we engaged 25,000 young voters in face-to-face conversations. We are the most powerful organization of young people in Ohio. And the student debt crisis is without a doubt one of the most pervasive, urgent, and dire issues facing Ohio’s young people today.

View original post 1,041 more words

Administrative Staffing 1987-2011, A Statistical Profile by Institution, Part 1: Alabama (Part 1)

ACADEME BLOG

The federal data that will be presented in this series of posts was analyzed by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NCIR) in collaboration with the American Institutes for Research. The NECIR story on the data and its implications, written by Jon Marcus, who is currently an editor at the Hechinger Report, is available at: http://necir.org/2014/02/06/new-analysis-shows-problematic-boom-in-higher-ed-administrators/.

NECIR is one of a number of foundation-supported nonprofits that produce journalism in collaboration with other media, in this case the Boston NPR station and the Huffington Post, where this story also ran.

The data is being re-posted here with the permission of Jon Marcus.

I believe that it is worth presenting the data state by state because, in its totality, the material is so extensive as to be overwhelming. I also hope that presenting it state by state may encourage some further use of it by our chapters and conferences…

View original post 22 more words

In Illinois, a Spotlight Is Put on Administrative Bloat

ACADEME BLOG

The Illinois State Senate’s Democratic Caucus has released a report on administrative bloat in the state’s colleges and universities. Although much of the focus is on executive compensation and expensive perks, there are many acknowledgements that the issues with executive compensation are indicative of proportionately high compensation throughout the administrative hierarchies of our institutions and of unchecked hiring of administrative support staff.

What is notable about this report is that, although Illinois has chronically underfunded its public pension system, it has maintained fairly high state support for public colleges and universities, especially when compared to other states in the Midwest. So, although it makes sense that legislators in Illinois should be especially cognizant of frivolous uses of tax revenues, it does not really make sense that other state governments that have dramatically reduced support for public higher education should be almost uniformly ignoring the issue of administrative bloat. The explanation…

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The Impact of the Trans Pacific Partnership on Higher Education

ACADEME BLOG

So how will the Trans Pacific Partnership, or TPP, impact higher education? The truth is that the details of the trade deal have been shrouded in such secrecy that we simply don’t know.

But if you would like to get some idea of what might be involved, you should take a look at a series of reports prepared by the European University Association (EUA) on the central issues for higher education related to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP, agreement.

The main issues related to higher education involve such things as (1) market access to higher- and adult-education providers, (2) mutual recognition of professional qualifications, (3) public procurement, (4) E-commerce and data protection, (5) protection of intellectual-property rights, and (6) investor-state dispute resolution.

The issues related to the TTIP agreement would seem a starting point for assessing the complexities involved in the TPP agreement.

The four EUA reports…

View original post 22 more words

An Interesting Series of Articles on Australian Higher Education

ACADEME BLOG

The Conversation is an Australian website that seeks to synthesize academic and journalistic inquiry in order to provide very thoughtful commentary of Australian and international issues. Its mission statement includes the following principles: to inform public debate with knowledge-based journalism that is responsible, ethical and supported by evidence; to unlock the knowledge of researchers and academics to provide the public with clarity and insight into society’s biggest problems; to create an open site for people around the world to share best practices and collaborate on developing smart, sustainable solutions; to provide a fact-based and editorially independent forum, free of commercial or political bias; and to support and to foster academic freedom to conduct research, teach, write and publish.

With the current Australian government committed to the deregulation of higher education fees, the editors of The Conversation are taking a taking a fresh look at the place of universities in Australia through a new series titled “What Are…

View original post 223 more words

Teaching Is Either a Profession or It’s Not

ACADEME BLOG

In a recent post to her blog, Diane Ravitch has reported on the ongoing effort to unionize the teachers in Detroit’s charter schools. At five of those schools, the AFT has held successful unionization campaigns.

But when they attempted to organize the teachers at the seven University Prep Schools managed by Detroit 90/90, the school operators contested the validity of even holding a vote on unionization by arguing that the teachers that it employs—in particular, those produced by Teach for America—are “not actually professionals.”

The teachers’ unions have been making precisely that argument ever since the charter school movement began relying on Teach for America to meet most of its staffing needs, but rather than trying to make the case that their teachers are qualified, the charter school operators have instead emphatically attributed just about every instance of low academic performance to the inadequacies of professional teachers. In other words…

View original post 283 more words